Net Worth Week 75 – Babies R Us Edition


Gentle Readers,
It is almost time to pack my bag to head to the baby-shower I dread. But, my rule as a human is to show up whenever possible. Even if the family member is a schmuck. Definitely for a baby-shower, especially if the family member is a schmuck since the baby needs examples of how to be good when people are unkind.
I have now paid for nearly half of my invisalign and should receive my first trays in the next 1.5 weeks. It’s going to be more painful in the short-term, but will hopefully correct some of my TMJ. My wallet is not pleased. Since I am worried about cash-flow for myself and my business, I’ve initiated a balance transfer to give me breathing space to deal with the preliminary invisalign costs.  I will have until August 2018 to pay it off. It was approved, but has not yet shown up in the statement.
My student loan payments increase in October because I am on IBR and my income last year was higher than the year before, and I now have a monthly recurring payment for the remainder of my invisalign treatment. The last payment for invisalign corresponds closely with my last Earnest payment. It’s going to be a tight few months.
My dentist was surprised that my treatment plan is for five months. She had envisioned it closer to nine months. With her payment plan, patients pay roughly half upfront and then the remainder in equal monthly payments for the duration of treatment. If my invisalign needed longer to correct my teeth, I would have less of a cash-flow worry in the next few months. At the end of the treatment, I’ll need to pay for a new night guard to match my new smile. Unless my TMJ is entirely corrected, which is not the anticipated result

This week’s net worth numbers

9/8/2017 9/15/2017
 Joy 1109 1109
 Travel 1  1
 Down Payment 19 19
 Retirement 21 21
 Health 46 46
 Moving 286 286
 EF 11 11
Business 5 5
Life 3282  4107
 IRA  13555  13882
 Brokerage 825  823
 Rewards Card 2 -3781 -6345
 CC (largest) 0  0
 CC (longest) 0  0
 Rewards Card 0  0
SL 1 -105503 -105619
SL 2 -46491 -46544
 Earnest -3147 -3154
 Net Worth -139762 -141352
 Percentage Change .24% -1.14%

How much have you spent at the dentist this year?

New FHA Mortgage Guidance Will Impact Borrowers With High Student Loan Debt

Gentle Readers,

I was having dinner with Mabel recently and she had some bad news for me. The federal government has issued new guidance for FHA loans. This guidance will make it far more difficult for people with high student loan debt to qualify for a mortgage. Me. It will make it far more difficult for me to qualify for a mortgage.

The Federal Housing Administration insures mortgage lenders as a way to encourage home ownership in the US. The FHA does not issue mortgages, but mortgage lenders use the insurance to stay in business in case too many people enter foreclosure. The FHA has guidance for the type of qualifications a person must meet when applying for a loan. If you are eligible for an FHA approved loan, your down payment can be as low as 3.5% which is far more attainable than the standard 20% necessary to avoid PMI. Not all mortgages meet the qualifications for an FHA loan.

Part of what the FHA measures when determining your loan eligibility is your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio.  Naturally, student debt counts as debt. However, it can be difficult to know exactly how to count this debt. Borrowers are allowed to pay back under a number of different terms and conditions. You may have a 10, 20, or 30 year schedule with or without some forgiveness of the debt itself. It’s complicated.

What concerns me today is the new rules for those of us who are paying back our student loans on an Income Based Repayment (IBR) Schedule. In IBR, you pay a percentage of your income towards your debt each month. This is not an amortizing payment. It is not intended to efficiently wipe out your debt. It is intended to give financial breathing room to people with student loan debt that is high in proportion to their income. I pay roughly $500 a month toward my student loan debt because of IBR. If I was paying an amortizing payment, I would pay closer to $1500 a month.

The FHA has new guidance for mortgages for people under IBR. If I want to use an FHA Loan, they will calculate my monthly debt obligation in a new way now. They no longer consider what my IBR obligation will be each month, which makes sense as the IBR changes yearly based on last year’s income.

The pertinent changes:

FHA 4000.1 Section II. A. 4. B. (H)

(4)  Calculation of Monthly Obligation
Regardless of the payment status, the Mortgagee must use either:

  • the greater of:
    • 1 percent of the outstanding balance on the loan; or
    • the monthly payment reported on the Borrower’s credit report; or
    • the actual documented payment, provided the payment will fully amortize the loan over its term.

What this means for me personally at my current student loan debt levels is that I will likely be ineligible for an FHA loan.

  • If my student debt obligation was calculated as it is now incurred, it would be $500/ month.
  • If my student debt obligation was calculated at 1% of the loan balance it would be $1450/month.
  • If my student debt obligation was calculated as if I were in the process of fully amortizing my loan over a 30 year term, it would be $936/month.

These are very different debt calculations and will absolutely impact my ability to get a loan. The difference between $500 and nearly $1500 will be a killer on my DTI ratio, which must be under 43% in order to qualify for any loan.

If I make $4000 a month, and have a $1500 a month student debt payment and $650 in other obligations, I would have a DTI of 2150:4000. Over 43%.

If I make $4000 a month, and have $500/m student debt payment and $650 in other obligations, my DTI would be 1150:4000. Under 43%

This change is literally the difference between getting a home and not.

With an income of $4000 per month, the highest my debt obligation could be and still leave me eligible for a mortgage is $1720.  After subtracting my other obligations, I would need my other student loan obligation to be less than $1070/m.

To get to $1000 a month in student loan debt obligation, I would need to reduce my student loans to $100,000 from their current high of roughly $145,000.  Alternatively, I could attempt to  increase my earnings to $5000/m and then my 2150:5000 DTI would be 43%.

So, plans must change. I have to kill my student debt.

Previously, my plan of action for when my income doubles was to increase my investment payments at a far greater rate than paying down my student loan debt since I wanted to get the magic of compounding going. My new plan must be to reduce my debt obligation significantly.

When the income doubles, if I make $8000/m, at least $5000 needs to go towards student debt. I have two student loans. One of them is roughly $45000 currently. I will focus all extra payments on that one. In nine months of focused payments, that debt will be almost wiped out.

I would still be left with a student loan obligation that is roughly $100K. 1% of 100,000 is $1000. If I had that $1000 plus $650 in other obligations against an income of $8000/m, my DTI would be 1650:8000. I would be eligible for a loan. With a doubled income, the highest DTI I could have and still be eligible for a loan would be 3440:8000.

Has governmental guidance ever changed your plans in a major way?