Trump’s First Executive Order and Your Mortgage

Gentle Readers,

You remember when I learned last summer that changes in FHA Mortgage Guidance would alter my ability to acquire a mortgage. My debt to income ratio has not improved significantly in the past 6 months, as anticipated. I did not think I would be able to pay off $45000, commonly referred to as SL2.

One of Trump’s first acts as the new President of the United States was to make mortgages harder to acquire for middle class folks.

The previous administration had a policy that Trump’s Administration blocked immediately upon assuming office. The policy was on track to reduce the cost of mortgages slightly for many home buyers. The policy was not yet in effect, but was imminently going to impact folks.

What policy are we talking about?

HUD sent a letter suspending the 0.25 % point premium rate cut for FHA-backed loans.  Nearly 20% of mortgages are FHA-backed. The beauty of the FHA is that their criteria make it accessible for more people to access capital necessary to buy a home and enjoy the tax benefits of home ownership. Their most-touted benefit is the significantly lower down-payment. As low as 3.5% of the purchase price. Homes in my high COL area regularly go for over $400,000. A standard 20% down payment is $80,000. A 3.5% down payment is $14,000. It is not hard to see why so many Americans need the help afforded by FHA.

How big is this impact?

Frankly, not big at all. The cut Obama attempted to enact would have saved homeowners with a $400,000 mortgage $58 per month.  Not insignificant, but not overwhelming for most people shopping for a mortgage.

The housing market in parts of the country, mine included, have been on fire lately. The prices are sky-rocketing. Some folks look at high prices and want in. It is unclear if this action will throw water on the housing bubble, but it might.

The most fascinating part for me is that Trump has re-made the fortune he was gifted by understanding the benefits our tax code gives to real estate. Having learned every trick in the book, is he going to encourage the IRS to re-write the book? May the US end a half-century long policy of encouraging home ownership through the tax code? If they did, would that be a bad thing necessarily?

A lot remains to be seen, but I think these tea leaves are impossible to read just yet.

Would you be happy to amend US tax code and move away from a home ownership model?

 

New FHA Mortgage Guidance Will Impact Borrowers With High Student Loan Debt

Gentle Readers,

I was having dinner with Mabel recently and she had some bad news for me. The federal government has issued new guidance for FHA loans. This guidance will make it far more difficult for people with high student loan debt to qualify for a mortgage. Me. It will make it far more difficult for me to qualify for a mortgage.

The Federal Housing Administration insures mortgage lenders as a way to encourage home ownership in the US. The FHA does not issue mortgages, but mortgage lenders use the insurance to stay in business in case too many people enter foreclosure. The FHA has guidance for the type of qualifications a person must meet when applying for a loan. If you are eligible for an FHA approved loan, your down payment can be as low as 3.5% which is far more attainable than the standard 20% necessary to avoid PMI. Not all mortgages meet the qualifications for an FHA loan.

Part of what the FHA measures when determining your loan eligibility is your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio.  Naturally, student debt counts as debt. However, it can be difficult to know exactly how to count this debt. Borrowers are allowed to pay back under a number of different terms and conditions. You may have a 10, 20, or 30 year schedule with or without some forgiveness of the debt itself. It’s complicated.

What concerns me today is the new rules for those of us who are paying back our student loans on an Income Based Repayment (IBR) Schedule. In IBR, you pay a percentage of your income towards your debt each month. This is not an amortizing payment. It is not intended to efficiently wipe out your debt. It is intended to give financial breathing room to people with student loan debt that is high in proportion to their income. I pay roughly $500 a month toward my student loan debt because of IBR. If I was paying an amortizing payment, I would pay closer to $1500 a month.

The FHA has new guidance for mortgages for people under IBR. If I want to use an FHA Loan, they will calculate my monthly debt obligation in a new way now. They no longer consider what my IBR obligation will be each month, which makes sense as the IBR changes yearly based on last year’s income.

The pertinent changes:

FHA 4000.1 Section II. A. 4. B. (H)

(4)  Calculation of Monthly Obligation
Regardless of the payment status, the Mortgagee must use either:

  • the greater of:
    • 1 percent of the outstanding balance on the loan; or
    • the monthly payment reported on the Borrower’s credit report; or
    • the actual documented payment, provided the payment will fully amortize the loan over its term.

What this means for me personally at my current student loan debt levels is that I will likely be ineligible for an FHA loan.

  • If my student debt obligation was calculated as it is now incurred, it would be $500/ month.
  • If my student debt obligation was calculated at 1% of the loan balance it would be $1450/month.
  • If my student debt obligation was calculated as if I were in the process of fully amortizing my loan over a 30 year term, it would be $936/month.

These are very different debt calculations and will absolutely impact my ability to get a loan. The difference between $500 and nearly $1500 will be a killer on my DTI ratio, which must be under 43% in order to qualify for any loan.

If I make $4000 a month, and have a $1500 a month student debt payment and $650 in other obligations, I would have a DTI of 2150:4000. Over 43%.

If I make $4000 a month, and have $500/m student debt payment and $650 in other obligations, my DTI would be 1150:4000. Under 43%

This change is literally the difference between getting a home and not.

With an income of $4000 per month, the highest my debt obligation could be and still leave me eligible for a mortgage is $1720.  After subtracting my other obligations, I would need my other student loan obligation to be less than $1070/m.

To get to $1000 a month in student loan debt obligation, I would need to reduce my student loans to $100,000 from their current high of roughly $145,000.  Alternatively, I could attempt to  increase my earnings to $5000/m and then my 2150:5000 DTI would be 43%.

So, plans must change. I have to kill my student debt.

Previously, my plan of action for when my income doubles was to increase my investment payments at a far greater rate than paying down my student loan debt since I wanted to get the magic of compounding going. My new plan must be to reduce my debt obligation significantly.

When the income doubles, if I make $8000/m, at least $5000 needs to go towards student debt. I have two student loans. One of them is roughly $45000 currently. I will focus all extra payments on that one. In nine months of focused payments, that debt will be almost wiped out.

I would still be left with a student loan obligation that is roughly $100K. 1% of 100,000 is $1000. If I had that $1000 plus $650 in other obligations against an income of $8000/m, my DTI would be 1650:8000. I would be eligible for a loan. With a doubled income, the highest DTI I could have and still be eligible for a loan would be 3440:8000.

Has governmental guidance ever changed your plans in a major way?